Diary of an electronic tag

Paolo Mazzoncini, Chief Social Work Officer for East Dunbartonshire Council, was one of four youth justice professionals who volunteered to wear an electronic tag for a week, and share the experience for CYCJ. Here he shares his tagging journey and the surprises, revelations and restrictions he encountered along the way. Sunday 9/10/16 A representative from […]

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To tag or not to tag? That is the question…

“No one really wants children ‘tagged’, but ultimately, no one wants to see children being locked up.”  Fiona Dyer considers the merits of electronic monitoring, otherwise known as ‘tagging’ and the impact it has – and can have – on care options. When MRC’s were first introduced for children, I, like many other social workers, […]

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Positive Youth Justice: Solving the youth crime ‘problem’ with children first solutions

After blogging on ‘negative’ youth justice, Professor Steve Case talks positive solutions in the follow up blog to his recent CYCJ seminar. In my previous blog, Negative youth justice: Creating the youth crime ‘problem’, I offered a somewhat scathing and sceptical perspective on contemporary youth justice, particularly how youth offending (understood through a risk perspective) has […]

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Negative Youth Justice: Creating the youth crime ‘problem’

How can we better understand youth offending? In the first instalment of a two-part blog, leading criminologist Professor Steve Case discusses negative youth justice and the impact it’s having, ahead of his Positive Youth Justice seminar on October 20 at CYCJ. Contemporary youth justice has seriously lost its way. An overview of international youth justice systems indicates a melting […]

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The waiting game

In his first blog as a CYCJ Associate, David Orr considers the delay between a sexual offence being committed and subsequent court proceedings, and the impact this can have on victims, perpetrators and the public. According to Youth Justice Board (YJB) statistics it takes on average 295 days from the date of a sexual offence […]

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From rhetoric to reality: improving outcomes for care leavers

It’s been almost a year since the Scottish Care Leavers Covenant was launched. Debbie Nolan considers the next steps, and how we can ensure the Covenant is meaningfully implemented in order to improve outcomes for Scotland’s care leavers. On joining CYCJ, one of the projects I was allocated to work on was the Scottish Care […]

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Worth a better future

The positively acclaimed STV Appeal ‘Who Cares’ documentary, about what it’s really like to be a looked after young person in Scotland, aired on September 20. Charlotte Morris recalls the stories behind the statistics, and how these can help us create a better future for every child. Imagine being moved – without any warning – to an entirely new place. You […]

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Reflections on the Scottish Youth Justice system

Jackie Anders, Student Engagement Manager with Melbourne’s Children Court, Australia, visited Scotland as part of her Churchill Fellowship travels. Here she discusses how the Australian youth justice system could benefit from Scotland’s community based approach. In May and June (2016) I had the wonderful privilege of travelling to the US, Scotland and Denmark as part of a Churchill Fellowship. The purpose of my study […]

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Victims of Youth Crime – recognising the harm

In our first guest post from the National Youth Justice Conference 2016, workshop leader Michael Salkow of Victim Support Scotland explains why recognising harm is so important for victims. At the National Youth Justice Conference in June I had the opportunity to deliver workshops on Victims of Youth crime – recognising the harm.  The workshop addressed […]

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Children's and Young People's Centre for Justice
University of Strathclyde
Lord Hope Building, Level 6
141 St. James Road Glasgow G4 0LT

(0141) 444 8622

cycj@strath.ac.uk

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