Retaining young offenders in the Children’s Hearing System

Debbie Nolan reports back from the SASO lecture, which asked why the Children’s Hearing System is not supporting more young people post-16. The Scottish Association for the Study of Offending (SASO) Glasgow Branch lecture on December 4, 2014 explored the pertinent issue of retaining young offenders in the Children’s Hearings System post-16. Having delivered training which included this issue just the […]

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Barnardo’s Scotland on ‘Youth Justice in Scotland: Fixed in the past or fit for the future?

We asked for your responses to our ‘Youth Justice in Scotland: Fixed in the past or fit for the future’ paper – and you didn’t disappoint! Over the next few months, we’ll be publishing these as blog posts. Please get involved in the conversation by adding your thoughts and comments. Our first post is from Barnado’s, […]

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Problem Solving Justice: are hugs the answer?

Stewart Simpson reports back from a Problem Solving Justice event, and asks if the American approach could work in Scotland. The recent Problem Solving Justice event held at University of Strathclyde brought together those from different perspectives including local authority social work, academia, decision makers (Crown Office and SCRA) and many more to talk about alternatives […]

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Putting children first

Our guest bloggers Sean Creaney and Dr Stephen Case argue the importance of participatory rights for children involved in the youth justice system. It is disconcerting that children – and their supervising officers (staff in multi-agency Youth Offending Teams/YOTs) – are finding that being involved in the criminal justice system is a disempowering and disengaging […]

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Lessons from Europe: from Spain’s ‘model prison’ to Will Cornick

David Orr discusses the sentencing of Will Cornick for the murder of Ann Maguire against the context of Spain’s progressive approach to youth justice. Controversial – or common sense? Read on to decide: Over the course of the last fortnight I have been affected strongly by two very different stories relating to juvenile justice in Europe. One […]

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Sugar ‘n’ Spice…or dangerously sexual?

Picture the scene: it’s the 19th century, and people are terrified of a dark threat that is lurking the streets and casting a shadow over households. That threat was not Jack the Ripper, but rather the women he stalked. Women who were seen to possess a ‘dangerous sexuality’ that they must be protected from, for […]

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When practice makes imperfect

With one foot in CYCJ and the other in social work practice, David Orr reflects on his time spent with the Centre… It’s the phones you notice. You are either on one, waiting for one to ring, waiting for someone to answer one or working out whether you have been screened out by Caller I.D. […]

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Celebrating the value of ‘dirty work’

Kristina Moodie attended Circle’s annual lecture which addressed the realities of social work practice, and came away realising social workers need support and not mistrust. Q: How come they bury social workers 300 feet in the ground? A: Deep down they are really good people. Circle is a Scottish charity that works in deprived communities […]

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Trafficking: why it’s everyone’s business

Charlotte Bozic and Jill McAfee write about why working together and taking a child-centered approach is key to tackling child trafficking, following the ‘Child Trafficking: A Scottish Perspective’ conference. On October 29, the Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice held a conference to raise awareness of trafficked children in Scotland and the practice issues of identification, assessment […]

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Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice
University of Strathclyde
Lord Hope Building, Level 6
141 St. James Road Glasgow G4 0LT

(0141) 444 8622

cycj@strath.ac.uk

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